Items filtered by date: February 2024

Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Types of Ankle Fractures

Ankle fractures can be grouped into two types, stable and unstable. The three parts of the ankle are the inner bump, or medial malleolus, the outer bump, or lateral malleolus, and the back bump, also known as the posterior malleolus. If only one bump is broken, it is usually a stable fracture. But if two or more bumps are broken, it is considered to be an unstable fracture and may need surgery. If you have a broken outer bump, you may wear a special boot or splint. For other ankle fractures, you will likely need a splint on the back of your leg and another one around your ankle. Rest and keeping your weight off the injured foot, in addition to using crutches might be needed. Some people may continue using crutches even after wearing the boot until they can put weight on the foot without pain. If you have broken your ankle, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a diagnosis, including the type of fracture you have sustained, and proper treatment for you.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Scott Amoss, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Specialists. our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Whiting and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Definition of Partial and Total Nail Avulsion

When grappling with the discomfort of ingrown toenails, partial and total nail avulsion emerges as a viable solution. Partial nail avulsion involves the removal of a portion of the affected nail, addressing the ingrown edge, and providing relief. This procedure aims to eliminate the problematic segment while preserving the overall integrity of the nail. Conversely, total nail avulsion involves completely removing the toenail, offering a more comprehensive approach to severe or recurrent ingrown toenails. Both procedures are typically performed under local anesthesia to minimize discomfort. Proper postoperative care is vital to promote healing and prevent complications following avulsion. Understanding the differences between partial and total nail avulsion allows individuals to make informed decisions in collaboration with podiatrists. If you have developed an ingrown toenail, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can determine if one of these types of surgery is right for you.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Scott Amoss, DPM of Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Whiting and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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